Port Chester makes Advanced Placement Honor Roll

Port Chester makes the grade by increasing AP access

  The Port Chester-Rye Union Free School District has been named to the College Board's AP District Honor Roll, one of just 373 districts in the U.S. and Canada and the only one in Westchester so honored.

The Honor Roll released this week recognizes districts that are committed to increasing access to Advanced Placement for underrepresented students while also maintaining or improving the rate at which their AP® students earned scores of 3 or higher on an AP Exam. 

National data from 2018 show that roughly half of underrepresented students with a high degree of readiness for Advanced Placement are participating in the program.

The Advanced Placement Program enables students to pursue college-level studies—not to mention college credits—while in high school by taking college-level courses and corresponding exams administered each year.

View the 9th Annual AP District Honor Roll  here.

Inclusion on the Honor Roll is based on examination of AP data from 2016 to 2018, for the following criteria:

  • Increased participation/access to AP by at least 4% in large districts, at least 6% in medium districts, and at least 11% in small districts;
  • Increased or maintained percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander students taking exams and increased or maintained the percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander students scoring 3+ on at least one AP Exam; and
  • Improved performance levels when comparing the percentage of students in 2018 scoring a 3 or higher than those in 2016, unless the district has already attained a performance level at which more than 70% of its AP students are scoring a 3 or higher.

Port Chester was noted by the College Board for achieving these outcomes among an AP student population in which 30% or more are underrepresented minority students and 30% or more are low-income.